“Taking Our Language back home” – Motivation and Challenges in the South Sami area.

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Title: Sami traditions: Márkomeannu’s contribution to the revitalization of sami Food traditions.

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Knives of Sebei: Women, ritual and Power. Sabiny perception on female genital mutilation and advocacy programs.

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Mind the Gap Greenland: Is there a gap between educational goals of the government and the aspirations of young People in Narsaq?

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Trapped in the net of circumstances. Nature use practices of Sami People of Lovozero in the changing socio-economic, administrative and environmental settings

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X’atsull Heritage village: A Case Study in Indigenous Tourism

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The role of affirmative action in higher education for indigenous People: The case of Yakutsk (Russia) and Tromsø (Norway

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Beaivvás- an institution for Sámi cuBeaivvás – an institution for Sámi culture management or mainstream entertainment?: The Sámi National Theater’s role in the Sámi community of Norway

Abstract
After the Sámi awakening movement in the 1970’s which culminated in the Alta conflict in 1981, the Sámi theater Beaivváš was created to highlight the Sámi language and culture in Norway. The theater became a success and was at first one of the main spokesmen for the Sámi people in the political and cultural contexts. As Sámi rights were recognized, Beaivváš and several Sámi institutions were established as a piece in the Sámi nation building process. In the process where Beaivváš went from a free theater group to a fixed item on the state budget, the Western theater form became applicable to the Sámi theater. Beaivváš has faced huge challenges in the management of the institution and has now come to a critical point in the development where the choice seems to be between commercialization of ancient Sámi arts- and cultural expressions or a closing of the Sámi national theater. This thesis’ purpose is to describe and analyze Beaivváš’ past and present role in the Sámi community in Norway and discuss a prospective solution for the theater’s role in the future. To look how other Indigenous peoples solve their culture preserving challenges, I have visited TIPA – the successful Tibetan Institute of Performing Arts in Dharamshala, India. The exile-Tibetans’ strategy for culture management is examined and discussed to determine whether TIPA is a possible model for how to conduct the Sámi culture institution Beaivváš in the future.
Thesis in Munin

Education and HIV/AIDS: A case study of educational practices of the indigenous Fantes, in the Cape Coast Municipality of Ghana

Author: Mel Gyamira Asiedu

Abstract:
This study addresses how Ghanaian educational systems educate the people of Cape Coast about the causes and prevention of the HIV/AIDS epidemic HIV/AIDS has been identified as one of the main challenges facing the educational sector in Ghana that deals with children from pre-school, basic, secondary and tertiary institution. Everyone in these categories, all children and students are at risk. Traditionally, puberty rites were used as a societal demand for adolescents to know their sexual life. The Ghana government has not included HIV/AIDS in the curriculum as a holistic subject where students can be tested about their knowledge. The government is double-minded recognizing traditional ideas and modern ideas. That is because there are many rites of passage embedded in Ghanaian cultural systems which make it difficult for the government to adopt one form of rite to be taught in schools. This creates a difficult situation The study reveals that the Fante puberty rites could be adopted on the Alert School Model to help prevent HIV/AIDS. It was realized that teachers in Cape Coast municipality are doing their best to teach HIV/AIDS education in schools despite the challenges they faced from the Ghana Education Service. The role of Fanti home based educational practices strongly influenced by traditional beliefs and practices will be compared and contrasted to modern public school based education and teaching young people about HIV/AIDS prevention. The method that was used in data collection at Cape Coast was interviews, observation and conversation which covered a sample of twenty one informants. Seven of the informants interview where used in the study. I supported primary data with secondary data from the Ghana HIV Sentinel Surveillance report, the impact evaluation of the alert school model and the HIV Alert School Model The findings in the study were analyzed qualitatively. A detailed description of puberty rites and the alert school model were discussed. Based on the findings in the study at Cape Coast, suggested recommendation and conclusion were drawn.

Thesis in Munin

Traditional camel management as an adaptation strategy to ecological changes: the case of Karrayyuu Oromo of Ethiopia

By: Amante, Debela Goshu

Abstract
This thesis is concerned primarily with Karrayyuu camel husbandry. Camel husbandry has flourished recently as an adaptation mechanism in response to ecological change. Karrayyuus have for centuries herded cattle, but recently, owing to ecological change, this has become unviable. Continued desertification, repeated drought and loss of land, has diminished the cattle herd size to a level that cannot support the herders and their families. One of the responses of the Karrayyuus to this process is the adoption of camel husbandry. Through camel husbandry, the Karrayyuus have managed to use pastures that were geographically marginal and nutritionally unpalatable for their cattle and small ruminants. Their knowledge of camels and their ecology, together with more effective management, has facilitated the recent growth of camel populations. However, camel husbandry still faces a problem with the sustainability of their current pastureland; this will determine whether Karrayyuu camel pastoralism continues to exist, or not. Key terms: Karrayuu, camel husbandry, ecological changes, ethno-ecology, adaptation.

Read thesis at Munin