On May 15th to 16th, the NordCO2 consortium gathered for a kick-off meeting in Tromsø. All the nodes had done their utmost to join for two days of science and festivities. We had people from all Nordic countries traveling far north to discuss science and collaborations. Below is a picture with some of the participants from Oslo University, Uppsala University, KTH – The Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm University, Helsinki University, Tromsø University, University of Iceland, and Carbon Recycling International.

On the afternoon of May the 14th, the PIs and the external advisory board gathered for a dinner at a restaurant aptly named SMAK. No pictures survived the evening, but there are rumours about some pictures of some food on the instagram of an unnamed PI.

The 15th would be a hard day for the PIs as they had to convene at 8:15 for the steering comittee meeting. On the agenda were how to organize our activities such as the Nordic Exchange Program, the summer school of 2019 and The PhD course that will be organized the coming fall.

After the steering comittee finished, the students started pouring in to start the main part of the program. The leader of the consortium, Kathrin Hopmann had some inaugeral words before the floor was left for the other PIs to introduce their research to the participants.

Below is Belén Martin-Matute presenting her work to the consortium:

After the scientific program we ventured back to the city center to dine at the hotel. Some of the northern specialities were served, such as whale, raindeer and cod.

The next morning we had the last presentations from the PIs and Omar Sigurbjörnsson from Carbon Recycling International on Iceland, as well as many students who showed their research to the rest of the group. The day had ample opportunity to discuss chemistry and collaborations.

After the official part of the program some people went to visit the cable car for a nice view of the city and the surrounding mountains. A group of danes disappeared from the group to hike down the mountain (no surprise that! They are not particularly used to heights!) They have later been observed in Aarhus, so we’re not too worried.

Thanks to everyone who participated and we will meet again soon!