Open research seminar June 1: Educational research with the San of southern Africa

Welcome to the second seminar this semester organised by the research group Space and Time in Education.

WHEN: 1 JUNE 2018, 12:15-14;00

WHERE: Campus Breivika, SVHUM E-0105

The topic of the seminar will be educational research with the San of southern Africa. The invited speaker is Jennifer Hays, who has been conducting research on educational and indigenous rights issues confronting San populations for over 20 years, and has worked in several different capacities – as a researcher, as an activist, coordinating projects, and as a project evaluator. In this presentation, she will provide an overview of the educational situation of the San, and describe her work, with particular focus on an education project that she has been following since 1998, the Nyae Nyae Village Schools. She will discuss methodological and ethical considerations of engaging in research with extremely marginalized groups.

Fruit, coffee and tea will be served.

See the event in the UiT-calender:

https://uit.no/tavla/artikkel/576569/research_seminar_about_educational_research_with

 


ABSTRACT, JENNIFER HAYS:

Educational Research with the San of southern Africa Jennifer Hays, sosialantropologi, ISV 1 June 2018 The San are indigenous (former) hunter-gatherers living in southern Africa. Several different language groups are included in this category, but today they are all among the most marginalized groups in the region, and their participation rates in national education systems are much lower than any other ethnic grouping. There are many proposed reasons for this, including linguistic and cultural differences, lack of trained teachers from their language groups, economic obstacles, and stigma. One important, but often overlooked, factor is that environmental factors, social realities, and livelihood opportunities in the remote areas where they live differ significantly from those of urban areas. Formal education has a strong bias towards urban realities, and assumes cultural awareness and aspirations that are often very different from those of San students.

Jennifer Hays has been conducting research on educational and indigenous rights issues confronting San populations for over 20 years, and has worked in several different capacities – as a researcher, as an activist, coordinating projects, and as a project evaluator. Her focus has been on both the barriers to their entry into, and success in, government schools, and also on their own cultural approaches to education and livelihood. In this presentation, she will provide an overview of the educational situation of the San, and will describe her work, with particular focus on an education project that she has been following since 1998, the Nyae Nyae Village Schools. She will discuss methodological and ethical considerations of engaging in research with extremely marginalized groups.

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