Do Not Step on the Farmer’s Grass: On global food economy, Inuit food security and sheep farming in South Greenland

Thesis by:  Saara Marjatta Sipola

Abstract:
Do not step on the farmer’s grass: On global food economy, Inuit food security and arctic agriculture is a thesis with a focus on Greenland as a part of the Inuit Nunaat, the Inuit homeland. This thesis is about the importance of indigenous food, harvest, and consumption. It is about connecting to indigenous cultures through food systems. Food systems that, in the case of Inuit, have sustained over thousands of years. Today this is not the case, and we all are consumers in what is called a global food economy. There is a vast range of literature suggesting that many indigenous peoples would still choose an indigenous diet, and participate in the food production, instead of being alienated from it. However, indigenous food production is largely perceived as ineffective and also non-profitable, thus it has had to change from large-scale industrial projects and mono-crop commercial agriculture. This thesis aims to illuminate the reasons for Inuit food insecurity beyond most often-stated reasons such as climate change or poverty. The argument set forth here is that indigenous people’s food insecurity cannot be separated from the colonial history, nor the current dominance of the global, capitalistic market forces: These issues being two sides of the same coin. Regardless of the destructive impacts on many indigenous societies, there is evidence of indigenous peoples’ resistance to seek solutions in circumstances of food insecurity, which be illustrated in the case of indigenous agriculture, and within sheep farming in South Greenland.

Thesis available

Queering quasar BO-2K. Dis/orienting white settler coloniality

Thesis by: D’Entremont, Cody Joshua

Abstract:
Taking Indigenous worlds seriously raises questions not only about the institutions and bureaucratization of settler colonialism as a never ending project; but also brings settler bodies, knowledges, and ontologies under questioning as they are the dominating worldings – to which they enact one-worlding. White settler bodies do not make up its whole, but are inseparable to its dynamic, fractured, and multiple transmutations through space and time. This project follows the tensions created out of the critiques found in Indigenous and people of colour narratives, art, music, and knowledges towards the white settler colonial body and its relations. Taking epistemic and body/intellectual differences seriously in their worlding otherwise is a difficult and challenging task – it is dis/orienting. However, It is not (im)possible.

Thesis is available

Shaping Indigenous Identity. The Power of Music

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Coastal Livelihoods in Northern Norway: Sustainable Development of Small-Scale Fishers and Sámi

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Educating the majority: How are the Norwegianization process and the Alta conflict presented in lower secondary School textbook?

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Clothes and Ethnic Identity: (Re) Constructing identity through cultural clothes as ethnic markers. The case of Siltie Nationality of Southern Ethiopia

Thesis by: Ahmed, Kederala Mohammed

District plans in Reindeer Husbandry in Northern Norway – Roles and Challenges

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Behind the scenes of street begging: Karamojong women of Northern Eastern Uganda

Thesis by: Musubika, Sarah
Abstract
When one walks through the various streets of Kampala, the capital city of Uganda, one encounters a diversity of beggars. Among them, are Karamojong women and children stationed at different places, and pleading with by-passers to offer them something. Scenes of Karamojong mothers breast feeding their babies while begging, and always set to run into hiding when they sight city authorities, are common on most busy streets of Kampala. This study investigated why Karamojong women engage in street begging, the challenges they encounter, how they cope, and the role men play. The study based on data gathered through qualitative ethnographic fieldwork in Kampala Uganda using interviews, observation, narratives and archival records. The violence and oppression that Karamojong women face daily during street begging requires an intersectional approach to obtain a better grasp of the situation. Through the fusion of Indigenous Feminism and Intersectionality, this study presents an analysis that takes into account the dynamics of race, ethnicity, class, gender and other dimensions of social inequality and difference that force Karamojong women into street begging. The findings show that the hassle of the city is tough, and only the fit survive. Karamojong women are determined and maneuver their way around the city even though they face many challenges as they go about begging. Their lives are entangled with historical effects of colonization, patriarchy, racism and sexism; which manifest through stigmatization, exploitation, prejudices and derogatory references both within and outside their society; all of which bolster subordination and vulnerability. Faced with such challenges, Karamojong women are strong, resilient people who do not concede to their plight, neither do they easily join the band wagon of the township. They still embrace their cultural values, identity, the right to be different and strive against all odds to fulfill their roles and responsibilities.
Thesis Munin

Indigenous Wellbeing in University Spaces: Experiences of Indigenous Students at the Australian National University

Abstract
This thesis aims to address the issue of Indigenous Australian conceptions of wellbeing in the context of university education. It will examine the role of an Indigenous student support unit in providing a space in which Indigenous wellbeing is enacted, supported and strengthened. The findings are based on discussions with six Indigenous students who were enrolled at the Australian National University and used the Tjabal Indigenous Higher Education Centre and one staff member. In this research I discuss how Indigenous students conceptualise and articulate wellbeing in a local university context. I also address institutional arrangements of university spaces in accounting for the differences in Indigenous student wellbeing. Lastly I examine how spaces for Indigenous wellbeing at the university are produced. I argue that students’ conception and articulation of wellbeing is based in a sense of belonging. Students experience challenges to wellbeing in university spaces as they enter racialised spaces. Wellbeing has also been challenged by culturally unsafe practices in some courses. The Tjabal Centre represents a space for Indigenous wellbeing which has been produced through spatial practice, the use of signs and symbols, and through planning. It is a space where Indigenous ontologies and epistemologies can be enacted in the everyday. Students have extended space for wellbeing on campus through the use of tactics and everyday acts of resistance.
Thesis Munin