Should you write on Wikipedia?

Picture of Trond Trosterud, our guest at Open Science Talk. Trosterud talks about Wikipedia.

So what should we make of Wikipedia?  We all know that as a student you should be careful about using Wikipedia as a cited source. There is no guarantee that the information is correct.  However, there is no denying that most of us use Wikipedia on a regular basis: When looking up stats on your favorite football player, reading up on your next vacation spot, yes even learning the basics of a field you didn’t study.

In many ways it’s brilliant, and there are good reasons why it’s one of the most used webpages on the internet.

But the question is: Should academics spend their time contributing to Wikipedia? In 2011 the Guardian wrote an article on this: Wikipedia wants more contributions from academics. Clearly, one can see the positive arguments for doing so. The public would have access to information from people who have spent their life studying a specific field, and there are some great communicators and good writers at universities who could explain difficult topics to readers.

Continue reading “Should you write on Wikipedia?”

Open Science & Ph.D-candidates

How can you inform Ph.D. Candidates and early career researchers about Open Science without becoming too political? Is information given about open science in conflict with the expectations for publishing from our universities?

Torstein Låg, psychologist and senior academic librarian at the University Library at UiT The Arctic University of Norway, weighs in on this topic.

Låg is also one of the editors of the web resource PhDonTrack.net.

Continue reading “Open Science & Ph.D-candidates”