Maxine Montgomery

    Maxine Montgomery 


Dr. Maxine Lavon Montgomery is a Professor of English at Florida State University where she specializes in African Diasporic, Post-Colonial, Contemporary Black Women’s fiction, and Post-Apocalyptic Literature and Culture along with Gender and Critical Race Studies.  She earned a bachelor’s and master’s degree from Florida State University, and she holds a doctorate in English with an emphasis on African American Literature from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

The recipient of four awards for excellence in university teaching, Dr. Montgomery has published widely on the fiction of Toni Morrison, and she is the author or editor of six books:  The Apocalypse in African American Fiction (University Press of Florida, 1996), Conversations with Gloria Naylor (University Press of Mississippi Press, 2004), The Fiction of Gloria Naylor:  Houses and Spaces of Resistance (University of Tennessee Press, 2010), Contested Boundaries:  New Critical Essays on the Fiction of Toni Morrison (Cambridge Scholars, 2013), Conversations with Edwidge Danticat (University Press of Mississippi, 2016), and most recently, New Critical Essays on Toni Morrison’s God Help the ChildMeditations on Race, Culture, and History (University Press of Mississippi, 2020).  Her articles and reviews have appeared in scholarly journals such as African American Review, The South Carolina Review, The College Language Association Journal, Sage, Palimpsest:  A Journal on Women, Gender, and the Black International, and The Journal of Black Studies.

A book-length monograph, The Post-Apocalyptic Black Female Imagination, is currently under contract with Bloomsbury Publishing (London, England).  In it, she interrogates tropes of post-apocalypticism in fiction and expressive culture by black women in the United States and Anglo-Caribbean, including Toni Morrison, Octavia E. Butler, Nalo Hopkinson, Edwidge Danticat, Michelle Cliff, Beyonce, and others with a view to illuminating black women’s contributions to fantasy culture and the speculative.  A follow-up project, Un-Zombifying Blackness:  Race, Gender, Sex and Vernacular Culture in Black Women’s Fiction, is in the proposal phase.