Where the River Begins

A film by Takashi Sakurai,
Country: USA,
Duration: 13min,
Language: Iñupiaq,
SubtitlesEnglish,
Year: 2003

Aliitchak, an Iñupiak elder living in the Kobuk River village of Ambler, persists in narrating local history and folktales in her native language.  The film follows Aliitchak’s subsistence activities at summer fish camp and her day-to-day activities in her home village.  Where the River Begins explores the struggle of Kobuk River people to maintain their language and cultural identity in a rapidly changing world.
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A Way of Making Life Beautiful

A film by Katrin Simone-Sakurai,
Country: USA,
Duration: 18min,
LanguageYup’ik , English,
SubtitlesEnglish,
Year: 2007

The Yup’ik people have been beautifying everyday objects and tools for centuries. Today, as a result of globalization and mass media, artistic trends are changing rapidly. Many Yup’ik artists straddle the values of two cultures.  This film explores the question of what it means to be a Yup’ik artist today. 
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Joe Sun

A film by Leonard Kamerling, Sarah Elder,
Country: USA,
Duration: 20min,
Language: Iñupiaq,
Subtitles: English,
Year: 1975

Joe Sun, an Iñupiaq elder from the village of Shungnak, grew up moving among seasonal camps in the Kobuk River Valley region of Alaska.  He tells of the legendary Iñupiaq prophet, Maniilaq, who predicted that “people with a different language would come and live among the Iñupiaq, and from that point on, everything would be changed.  He even predicted that people would start traveling in the air.” Joe Suns talk is known as an uqaaqtuaq. Elders gave such talks to young people who came seeking information or advice.
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In Iirgu’s Time

A film by Leonard Kamerling, Sarah Elder,
Country: USA,
Duration: 20min,
Language: Siberian Yup’ik,
Subtitles: English,
Year: 1974

As his two grandchildren listen, Samuel Iirgu, an elder from the village of Gambell, St. Lawrence Island, recounts events in the community from the time the first missionaries arrived. His story is known as an ungipamsuk or true historical narrative. Traditionally, a storyteller’s integrity was based on the accuracy of his ungipamsuk; exaggeration was considered a sign of weakness.  Iirgu describes how the missionaries succeeded in converting people and the problems that visiting people from Siberia caused the missionaries.

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At the Time of Whaling

A film by Leonard Kamerling, Sarah Elder,
Country: USA,
Duration: 40min,
Language: Siberian Yup’ik,
Subtitles: English,
Year: 1974

“When our ancestors hunted a whale,” elder Lincoln Pelaasi from the village of Gambell, St. Lawrence Island, tells us, “They harpooned it right on each cheek. Attached to the harpoon was a walrus skin rope and at the end of each rope was a small bag of water.  If the whale went to the right, they shook the bag on that side and he would go to the left, turning away from the sound of the water. Those big whales, just like dogs they would steer them to the land. This is how it was done.” From the roof of a snow-covered house men with binoculars scan the ocean for signs of whales.  It is April and the Bowhead whales are beginning their summer migration to Arctic waters. For generations, St. Lawrence Island hunters have waited in this very same place for their arrival.  The hunters launch their skin boats under sail and soon an exuberant voice on the CB radio shouts the news of a strike. The boats power up their motors and join the others to help corral and tow the whale back to shore where the three-day task of butchering and distributing the meat begins.

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On the Spring Ice

A film by Leonard Kamerling, Sarah Elder,
Country: USA,
Duration: 45min,
Language: Siberian Yup’ik,
Subtitles: English,
Year: 1975

Elder Lloyd Oovie, from the village of Gambell, St. Lawrence Island, recounts the mysteries of sea ice, “Long ago, people were drifted by the pack ice. It took them far away and they were never seen again.  Nothing is too big for the ice to move.  When seen for the first time, it is a mysterious thing to watch”.  A cluster of men stands on a rooftop scanning the sea.  A walrus hunting party is in distress far out on the ice.  The weather is bad and they are being drifted towards Siberia. Long ago, there was nothing that could have been done to save them.  Now they have options.  The men discuss the situation and finally decide to call the Coast Guard.  A rescue helicopter is dispatched from Kodiak, 650 miles away.  The next day, the men prepare for another walrus hunt.  They travel through leads in the pack ice where they spot two walrus sunning themselves on the ice.  Back in the village, the meat is cut, distributed, and hung to dry.
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Uksuum Cauyai: The Drums of Winter

A film by Leonard Kamerling, Sarah Elder,
Country: USA,
Duration: 90min,
LanguageYup’ik, English,
Subtitles: English,
Year: 1988

Dance was once at the heart of Yup’ik spiritual, social, and economic life. It was the bridge between the ancient and the present, the living and the dead and a person’s own power and the greater powers of the unseen world. Uksuum Cauyai: The Drums of Winter, presents the spiritual world of Yup’ik dance, music, and reciprocal gift-giving. The Yup’ik people speak about how their history, social values, and spiritual beliefs are woven around the songs and dances that have been handed down to them through the generations.  Named to the National Film Registry of the Library of Congress in 2006.

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Out of the Corner

A film by Maria Kirpichenko,
Country: Russia,
Duration: 27min,
Language: Russian,
Subtitles: English,
Year: 2012

The film gives the opportunity to see several women from Russia who are engaged in boxing on the highest level of the National Women’s Boxing Team. We follow them in different places and tasks and become acquainted with their strong personalities. Women’s boxing and “traditional” Russian society seem to oppose each other but when we get closer stereotypes gradually vanish, though they remain at the formal (state) level. Main heroes of the film: Anastasia Zapolskaya (Makarova), Serafima Makarova, Lubov Pashina. The action takes place in Karelia (North of Russia), Krasnoarmeisk (boxing training camp near Moscow), Novosibirsk (Russia Women’s Boxing Championship, Siberia), Anapa (boxing training camp, South of Russia). The film is not about boxing itself but about women who dared to enter the “male domain” (going out of the corner) and still try to fit into the traditional gender roles (putting them(selves) into boxes).

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Uncle Oddvar and the Wave

A film by Katriina Pedersen,
Country: Norway,
Duration: 32min,
Language: Norwegian,
Subtitles: English,
Year: 2011

Uncle Oddvar and The Wave is a character-driven film about a soon to be a 70-year-old fisherman from a little village in the north of Norway. Every spring and summer he produces stockfish for a global market as one of the last ones in the village. We follow uncle Oddvar and his stockfish from April to September and get a glimpse into the life of a fisherman. Through uncle Oddvar’s stories and songs, the film brings up themes of traditional knowledge, aging, fish farming, the outside world, and the environment.

Interview with the Filmmaker:
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We Can Almost Fly

A film by Maria Gradin,
Country: Norway,
Duration: 28min,
Language: Norwegian,
Subtitles: English,
Year: 2006

The film is a study of the concept of New Circus through a circus group in Tromsø (Norway), Circus Kulta. It consists of children, youth, and a group of professional New Circus performers. In the film, we can follow them from personal challengers to mastering and from practicing to performances.

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