The Reindeer Thief

A film by Leonard Kamerling, Sarah Elder,
Country: USA,
Duration: 15min,
Language: English,
Subtitles: N/A,
Year: 1974

Lincoln Pelaasi is an elder from the village of Gambell, St. Lawrence Island.  He tells a mythical story about a man who goes out in search of a reindeer thief. The ensuing encounter becomes a test of supernatural powers and human/animal transformation. Pelaasi’s story is called an ungipaghaq, a tale that has been passed down unchanged through generations and is believed to be based on truth. Like many St. Lawrence Island legends, this story is set in Siberia.
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Joe Sun

A film by Leonard Kamerling, Sarah Elder,
Country: USA,
Duration: 20min,
Language: Iñupiaq,
Subtitles: English,
Year: 1975

Joe Sun, an Iñupiaq elder from the village of Shungnak, grew up moving among seasonal camps in the Kobuk River Valley region of Alaska.  He tells of the legendary Iñupiaq prophet, Maniilaq, who predicted that “people with a different language would come and live among the Iñupiaq, and from that point on, everything would be changed.  He even predicted that people would start traveling in the air.” Joe Suns talk is known as an uqaaqtuaq. Elders gave such talks to young people who came seeking information or advice.
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In Iirgu’s Time

A film by Leonard Kamerling, Sarah Elder,
Country: USA,
Duration: 20min,
Language: Siberian Yup’ik,
Subtitles: English,
Year: 1974

As his two grandchildren listen, Samuel Iirgu, an elder from the village of Gambell, St. Lawrence Island, recounts events in the community from the time the first missionaries arrived. His story is known as an ungipamsuk or true historical narrative. Traditionally, a storyteller’s integrity was based on the accuracy of his ungipamsuk; exaggeration was considered a sign of weakness.  Iirgu describes how the missionaries succeeded in converting people and the problems that visiting people from Siberia caused the missionaries.

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At the Time of Whaling

A film by Leonard Kamerling, Sarah Elder,
Country: USA,
Duration: 40min,
Language: Siberian Yup’ik,
Subtitles: English,
Year: 1974

“When our ancestors hunted a whale,” elder Lincoln Pelaasi from the village of Gambell, St. Lawrence Island, tells us, “They harpooned it right on each cheek. Attached to the harpoon was a walrus skin rope and at the end of each rope was a small bag of water.  If the whale went to the right, they shook the bag on that side and he would go to the left, turning away from the sound of the water. Those big whales, just like dogs they would steer them to the land. This is how it was done.” From the roof of a snow-covered house men with binoculars scan the ocean for signs of whales.  It is April and the Bowhead whales are beginning their summer migration to Arctic waters. For generations, St. Lawrence Island hunters have waited in this very same place for their arrival.  The hunters launch their skin boats under sail and soon an exuberant voice on the CB radio shouts the news of a strike. The boats power up their motors and join the others to help corral and tow the whale back to shore where the three-day task of butchering and distributing the meat begins.

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On the Spring Ice

A film by Leonard Kamerling, Sarah Elder,
Country: USA,
Duration: 45min,
Language: Siberian Yup’ik,
Subtitles: English,
Year: 1975

Elder Lloyd Oovie, from the village of Gambell, St. Lawrence Island, recounts the mysteries of sea ice, “Long ago, people were drifted by the pack ice. It took them far away and they were never seen again.  Nothing is too big for the ice to move.  When seen for the first time, it is a mysterious thing to watch”.  A cluster of men stands on a rooftop scanning the sea.  A walrus hunting party is in distress far out on the ice.  The weather is bad and they are being drifted towards Siberia. Long ago, there was nothing that could have been done to save them.  Now they have options.  The men discuss the situation and finally decide to call the Coast Guard.  A rescue helicopter is dispatched from Kodiak, 650 miles away.  The next day, the men prepare for another walrus hunt.  They travel through leads in the pack ice where they spot two walrus sunning themselves on the ice.  Back in the village, the meat is cut, distributed, and hung to dry.
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Niger-Norway

A film by Lisbet Høltedahl,
Country: Niger, Norway,
Duration: 40min,
Language: Norwegian,
Subtitles: English,
Year: 1975

A comparison of women’s life in Niger and Norway. Film footage and photos were taken at the beginning of the 1970s in the village of Maïné-Soroa, in Eastern Niger, juxtaposed with audio-visual material from Tromsø in Northern Norway. Using a simple, didactic voice-over, the film questions many stereotypes about women’s lives in Africa and Norway. It is an attempt to use audio-visual tools and fieldwork experience to teach cross-cultural understanding and ethnocentrism in Norway.

Interview with the Filmmaker:
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Inuits of Pond Inlet

A film by Michael Grigsby,
Anthropologist: Hugh Brody,
Country: Canada,
Duration: 50min,
Language: Inuit,
Subtitles: English,
Year: 1976

In this unique story from Canada’s largest and northernmost territory, Nunavut, we visit the small Inuit community of Pond Inlet. Through interviews and rare footage, the viewer is offered an exclusive insight into the lives of this group of Canadian natives, who are living as would their ancestors for hundreds of years: in close connection with the harsh and beautiful nature surrounding their small village above the Arctic Circle. The documentary also describes how the impact of white Canadians’ arrival to the area has affected the locals in various ways.

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