Torjer Andreas Olsen

Torjer Andreas Olsen

Professor/Academic Director

Centre for Sami Studies
UiT The Arctic University of Norway
torjer.olsen@uit.no
+47 776 46 912
+47 416 38 224

 

 

Torjer A. Olsen works at the Centre for Sami Studies. He teaches methods and methodology at the Master’s degree program in indigenous studies. In his research, Olsen works with indigenous issues in education, gender and power issues within indigenous research, and  religion in indigenous contexts. For the ICE project, Olsen will be doing his research on educational encounters related to indigenous contexts, on curriculum and textbook analysis, and on methodologies.

Read more at the contact page of his home university.

 

Else Grete Broderstad

Else Grete Broderstad

Professor

Centre for Sami Studies
UiT The Arctic University of Norway
else.g.broderstad@uit.no
+47 776 46 908

 

Else Grete Broderstad is Professor of Indigenous Studies and the academic coordinator of the Master in Indigenous Studies at UiT The Arctic University of Norway. Broderstad is Dr. Polit. in Political Science. She was a member of the first governmental committee on the High North and a member of the Sami Rights Commission (2000-2007). Her research interests are within the areas of governance, indigenous rights and political participation. She is occupied with political procedures in the relationship between indigenous minorities and majorities, with a particular focus on discussions of the coherence between indigenous claims for self-determination, and regional and local claims of effective participation. Broderstad was one of leaders for the community interviews in the cross-disciplinary project TUNDRA, and is now leading the research projects TriArc and IndKnow. For the ICE project, she will continue her work on the bonds between indigenous rights and citizenship rights.

 

Read more at the contact page of her home university.

 

 

Hilde Sollid

Hilde Sollid

Professor

Department of Language and Culture
UiT The Arctic University of Norway
hilde.sollid@uit.no
+47 776 46 175
+47 918 43 115

 

Hilde Sollid is Professor of Scandinavian Linguistics at the Department of Language and Culture at UiT The Arctic University of Norway. Sollid teaches in the BA and MA in Scandinavian Studies, and also has extensive experience in teacher education for primary and secondary school. She contributes to ProTed (Professional Learning in Teacher Education), Centre of Excellence in Teacher Education. A main theme in Sollid’s research is socio-linguistic perspectives on Northern Norway as a multilingual region, both inside and outside the classroom.

 

Read more at the contact page of her home university.

 

Bengt-Ove Andreassen

Bengt-Ove Andreassen

Professor

Department of Education
UiT The Arctic University of Norway
bengt.ove.andreassen@uit.no
+47 776 60 469

 

Bengt-Ove Andreassen is PhD and Professor in the study of religions at the Department of Education, UiT The Arctic University of Norway. One of Andreassen’s main areas of research is Religion Education (RE). He has done research on textbooks and curricula in RE, and also about Sami content in Norwegian curricula for school and kindergarten.

 

Read more at the contact page of his home university.

 

Pigga Keskitalo

Pigga Keskitalo

Title of Docent, Doctor of Education. University Researcher

Department of Education
The University of Lapland
pigga.keskitalo@ulapland.fi
+358 40 4844153

Pigga Keskitalo works as a researcher at the University of Lapland, Finland. She also works as a researcher at the Sámi University of Applied Sciences, Norway, where children’s ethical thinking is investigated. Formerly, Keskitalo worked for 20 years at the Sámi University of Applied Sciences in the field of Sámi teacher education. At the moment, she is working on an Academy of Finland funded project that aims to develop Sámi language distance education. In addition, she is involved in several development projects, including Arctic Pedagogy 2 (funded by the European Social Fund), and eLappi development of teacher competence in digital pedagogy (also funded by the European Social Fund). Keskitalo’s research interests focus broadly on the field of Sámi education and its research. For example, she has been involved in developing Indigenous research methods and has been also involved in researching children from different perspectives. Keskitalo’s PhD dissertation investigated how the Sámi curriculum in Norway is conducted at the Sámi schools.

 

Read more at the contact page of her home university.

 

Hanna Outakoski

Senior Lecturer/Researcher

Department of Language Studies
Umeå University and UiT The Arctic University of Norway
hanna.outakoski@umu.se
hanna.m.outakoski@uit.no
+46 907 866 326

 

Dr. Hanna Outakoski is a Senior Lecturer in North Sámi at the Department of Language Studies at Umeå University, Sweden, and at UiT The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø. Outakoski is currently doing research on the teaching of heritage language writing at Nordic universities and in Sámi medium primary schools. One of the aims of the current collaborative research is to examine how to implement Indigenous teaching methods so as to strengthen the position of Sámi writing among Sámi youth. Apart from literacy studies, Outakoski’s research interests lie on North Sami grammar and syntax, as well as on the possibilities and potential of using virtual worlds and virtual classrooms for language revitalization. 

 

Read more at the contact page of her home university.

 

Åse Mette Johansen

Åse Mette Johansen

Associate professor

Department of Language and Culture
UiT The Arctic University of Norway
ase.mette.johansen@uit.no
+47 776 45 797

 

Åse Mette Johansen is Associate Professor of Scandinavian Linguistics in the Department of Language and Culture at UiT The Arctic University of Norway. Johansen teaches sociolinguistics both at undergraduate and postgraduate levels. Her research interests include language variation and change, dialect and language contact, multilingualism, language revitalization, and language in adolescence. In the ICE project, she will do ethnographic fieldwork in schools in Northern Norway in order to explore indigenous citizenship through the lens of language.
 
 
Read more at the contact page of her home university.
 
 
Annamari Vitikainen

Annamari Vitikainen

Associate Professor

Department of Philosophy
UiT The Arctic University of Norway
annamari.vitikainen@uit.no
+47 776 23330

 

Annamari Vitikainen is an Associate Professor of Philosophy (UiT), with special interest in contemporary Political Philosophy, especially issues relating to cultural diversity, minority and group rights, migration, and sexuality and gender. Her latest book, The Limits of Liberal Multiculturalism: Towards an Individuated Approach to Cultural Diversity, was published by Palgrave Macmillan in 2015. Vitikainen is currently the leader of the Pluralism, Diversity, and Justice research group in political philosophy, and a co-leader of the Globalizing Minority Rights research project (2016-2020). At present, Vitikainen is working on questions relating to different kinds of cross-border group protections (including the indigenous Sami), intersectionally vulnerable groups (such as LGBTQ refugees), and on the conceptual issues of indigenous citizenship and citizenship education.

Read more at the contact page of her home university.

 

Kjersti Fjørtoft

Kjersti Fjørtoft

Professor

Department of Philosophy
UiT The Arctic University of Norway
kjersti.fjortoft@uit.no
+47 776 45 915
+47 481 59 619

 

Kjersti Fjørtoft’s academic interests are Political Philosophy, Ethics, Feminist Philosophy and Research Ethics. She has published on issues concerning theories of justice, human capabilities, feminism and justice and democracy.
 
Fjørtoft is a member of the research groups Pluralism, Democracy and Justice, and the research group in Feminist Philosophy at the Department of Philosophy, UiT. She is also a member of the NRC project Active Citizenship in culturally and religiously diverse societies, hosted by The Peace Research institute Oslo (PRIO).
 
 
Read more at the contact page of her home university.
 
Velina Ninkova

Velina Ninkova

Postdoctoral Fellow

Centre for Sami Studies
UiT The Arctic University of Norway
velina.ninkova@uit.no
+47 77645904

 

Read more at the contact page of her home university.

 

Kristin Evju

Kristin Evju

PhD student

Centre for Sami Studies
UiT The Arctic University of Norway
kristin.evju@uit.no
+47 77646900

 

Read more at the contact page of her home university.

 

Sharon Harvey

Sharon Harvey

Associate Professor

Auckland University of Technology
School of language and culture
sharon.harvey@aut.ac.nz
+64 9 921 9999 ext 9659

 

Associate Professor Sharon Harvey is Head of the School of Language and Culture and Deputy Dean (Research) of the Faculty of Culture and Society at Auckland University of Technology (AUT). Harvey was an ESOL and workplace literacy teacher for many years. Over the last 22 years, she has been closely involved in the development of postgraduate programmes, and a research culture, at AUT. As an applied linguist, Sharon’s research interests include language learning and teaching, language policy and planning, intercultural communication and competency, language education evaluation, and language teacher development.

 

Read more at the contact page of her home university.

 
Dr Diane Smith

Dr Diane Smith

Senior Research Fellow

Centre for Aboriginal Economic Policy Research
Australian National University
diane.smith@anu.edu.au
+61 2 6125 0481

 

Diane Smith is an Anthropologist with over 40 years’ experience working with Indigenous Australian communities and organizations in remote, rural, and urban locations. She is currently a Research Fellow at the Centre for Aboriginal Economic Policy Research, The Australian National University, in Canberra, Australia.

Dr Smith has carried out extensive governance research with Indigenous groups in Australia, and published widely on related issues of Indigenous policy, governance, and capacity development, research methods, native title, and land rights, organizational effectiveness, and cultures of governance. She was Chief Investigator of the ground-breaking Australian Indigenous Community Governance Research Project, and subsequently wrote the learning content for the Indigenous Governance Toolkit: a web-based resource that assists Indigenous people in their efforts to build effective and culturally legitimate governance. She is currently commencing a two-year national research project on the Indigenous Governance of Development in partnership with the Australian Indigenous Governance Institute and several Indigenous research partners.

 

Read more at the contact page of her home university.

 

Dr Bill Fogarty

Dr Bill Fogarty

Senior Research Fellow

Centre for Aboriginal Economic Policy Research
Australian National University
bill.fogarty@anu.edu.au
+61 2 6125 4221

 

Bill Fogarty is Deputy Director and Senior Research Fellow at the Centre for Aboriginal Economic Policy Research, The Australian National University. He has a wealth of experience working on the development of Indigenous education programs, health discourse, Indigenous cultural and natural resource management, Indigenous sport, and Indigenous development policy across Australia. Bill has lived, worked, and researched in remote Indigenous communities for over 20 years and has conducted numerous research projects, consultancies, and evaluations on various forms of development throughout Australia. He is currently engaged in a number of high-level research engagements across Australia, as well as in Norway, Canada, and New Zealand.

 

Read more at the contact page of his home university.

 

Alice Wighton

Alice Wighton

ICE Project Research Assistant

Centre for Aboriginal Economic Policy Research
Australian National University
alice.wighton@anu.edu.au
+61 2 6125 0073

 

Alice Wighton is the current Research Assistant on the Indigenous Citizenship and Education project. She is based in Canberra, Australia, and will work in this role until 31 December 2020.

Alice also works as a tutor and Research Officer at the Centre for Aboriginal Economic Policy Research, The Australian National University. She has previously held positions at the Australian Indigenous Governance Institute and the National Centre for Indigenous Studies, where she has contributed to several research projects. Alice’s Honours research problematised and stimulated new ways of thinking about the widespread and largely uncritical use of liberal political reason in Australian Indigenous affairs discourse. Alice maintains her critical interest in liberal systems of thought and knowledge production and is currently exploring how the contemporary neoliberal university structures students’ engagement with Australian Indigenous Studies.

 

Read more at the contact page of her home university.