Products

CLEAR is committed to building internet resources that are free, open-source, and publicly available and support both linguistic research and research-based student-centered language pedagogy.

Resources CLEAR has built:


  • SMARTool

    • Available at https://smartool.github.io/smartool/
    • The SMARTool is a free web resource for L2 learners of Russian that implements findings of a learning simulation experiment and corpus research to optimize the acquisition of Russian vocabulary and morphology.

  • Russian Constructicon

    • New user interface is under construction
    • Old version is available at https://spraakbanken.gu.se/karp/#?mode=konstruktikon-rus
    • The Russian Constructicon is a free open-access electronic database of Russian constructions accompanied with thorough descriptions of their properties and illustrative examples from the Russian National Corpus.

  • Ikke bare-bare – en liten bok om å oversette til russisk

    • Available at https://septentrio.uit.no/index.php/SapEdu
    • This is an electronic supplement for the book Ikke bare-bare – en liten bok om å oversette til russisk by Tore Nesset and Anastasia Makarova (Novus 2016)
    • The website contains videos and interactive exercises for each chapter of the book.
    • Topics covered: verb aspect, verbs of motion, numerals and quantifiers, short forms of adjectives, impersonal constructions, passive, participles and gerunds, complex sentences, and word order.

  • How Russian Came to Be the Way it Is

    • Available at https://septentrio.uit.no/index.php/SapEdu/issue/view/269
    • This is an electronic supplement for the book How Russian Came to Be the Way it Is: A Student’s Guide to the History of the Russian Language by Tore Nesset (Slavica Publishers 2015).
    • The website contains videos for each chapter of the book.


  • TOROT

    • Available at https://nestor.uit.no/users/sign_in
    • Тhe Tromsø Old Russian and OCS Treebank (TOROT) contains more than 250,000 words of Old and Middle Russian text with morphological and syntactic annotation and is the only resource of its kind.

  • Varangian Rus’ Digital Environment

    • Old Russian dictionary http://syntacticus.org/browse
    • The resource provides an electronic dictionary, text comments, and interactive exercises, webpage is currently under construction.

  • Supplement for the EE book

    • Available at http://emptyprefixes.uit.no/book.htm
    • This is an electronic supplement for the book “Why Russian aspectual prefixes aren’t empty: prefixes as verb classifiers” by Laura Janda, Anna Endresen, Julia Kuznetsova, Olga Lyashevskaya, Anastasia Makarova, Tore Nesset, Svetlana Sokolova (2013).
    • The website contains additional data from the studies we describe, semantic models of eleven aspectual prefixes, scripts for statistical models, and commentaries.

  • Exploring Emptiness database

    • Available at http://emptyprefixes.uit.no/index.php
    • Exploring Emptiness (EE) database is a free open-access searchable database that contains information on 1,981 aspectual pairs of simplex Russian verbs and their perfective counterparts formed via prefixation.


  • Aspect in Russian MediaModule

    • Available at http://ansatte.uit.no/laura.janda/aspect/ainr/
    • The Aspect in Russian MediaModule is a suite of interactive learning environments combining images, animation, and sound with hundreds of authentic examples, giving learners the opportunity to explore the use of Russian aspect, which is the most difficult grammatical category for learners to acquire.

  • Case Book for Russian Interactive Exercises

    • Available at https://sites.fas.harvard.edu/~sclancy/casebooks/russian/
    • These are online interactive exercises based on hundreds of authentic examples of the use of the six Russian grammatical cases, accompanied by sound (read by native speakers). These exercises are the companion to The Case Book for Russian published by Laura A. Janda and Steven J. Clancy in 2002, which in 2005 won the Book Prize for “Best Contribution to Pedagogy” from the American Association of Teachers of Slavic and East European Languages.

  • Case Book for Czech Interactive Exercises

    • Available at https://sites.fas.harvard.edu/~sclancy/casebooks/czech/
    • These are online interactive exercises based on hundreds of authentic examples of the use of the seven Czech grammatical cases, accompanied by sound (read by native speakers). These exercises are the companion to The Case Book for Czech published by Laura A. Janda and Steven J. Clancy in 2006.

 

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